From the October/November 2018 Issue

Distinguished Design

Writer Marirose Krall  |  Photographer Christie's International Real Estate  |  Builder Jay Grant  |  Location Princeton, NJ
  • This Princeton, New Jersey home was designed in 1925. “The original color around the windows was green,” Grant says. Though black might have been a safer way to go because it’s a very popular window color now, Grant felt this hemlock shade would maintain the overall architectural integrity of the home.

  • This Princeton, New Jersey home was designed in 1925. “The original color around the windows was green,” Grant says. Though black might have been a safer way to go because it’s a very popular window color now, Grant felt this hemlock shade would maintain the overall architectural integrity of the home.

  • This Princeton, New Jersey home was designed in 1925. “The original color around the windows was green,” Grant says. Though black might have been a safer way to go because it’s a very popular window color now, Grant felt this hemlock shade would maintain the overall architectural integrity of the home.

In Princeton, New Jersey, it’s not just the university that’s illustrious

Many towns have a house that’s instantly recognizable to people living in the surrounding area. In Princeton, New Jersey, it’s this 1925 fieldstone residence. “The house is noticeable and notable,” says Jay Grant, president of Mendham, NJ-based Grant Homes and owner of this residence.

Designed by architect Ernest Flagg, the home was first owned by Walter W. Colpitts, a civil engineer, Grant notes. “As an engineer, he may have been impressed by Flagg’s structural approaches.” Over the years, the home changed hands several times until Grant purchased it several years ago. (It was once owned by descendants of J. Seward Johnson, a renowned sculptor and grandson of Robert Wood Johnson, cofounder of New Brunswick, New Jersey-based Johnson & Johnson. Seward Johnson’s home is also featured in this issue beginning on page 96).

DNJ: What is the architectural style of this home?
Jay Grant: It is most similar to a Normandy Manor style, but it has many of its own unique architectural details, including the roofline and the stone detail. The architect, Ernest Flagg, was quite famous in the early 20th century. He designed the Singer Building in Manhattan, which, at 47 stories, was the tallest building in the world at the time it was constructed.

Find the full article in our October/November 2018 issue out now.