From the October/November 2009 Issue:

Stately Homes By-the-Sea Show House

Designers transform a 1915 home known as Sheep’s Run for the 2009 Visiting Nurse Association of Central Jersey fund-raiser At the Stately Homes By-the-Sea Show House in May, visitors got a taste of elegant country living and a sense of how people lived in 1915, the year the home was built and a time when Rumson was still in the country, manners were de rigueur, and details mattered. Now known as Sheep’s Run, the new owners, the Mulheren family, offered the historic building as site of this year’s show house, which benefits the Visiting Nurse Association of Central Jersey. Design NJ was the media sponsor for the show house. A range of top designers, architects, decorators, muralists, landscapers, and other artisans restored elegance to the home, but in a manner appropriate for today.


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Entryway: The entrance is emblematic of the Cotswold cottage-style home. Along with the other furnishings, Raymond Valerio and his staff at Tower Hill Antiques & Design chose a custom doormat that depicts the estate’s namesake, a sheep. Tim Murphy of Tim Murphy Decorative Painting added a compass design to the barrel-vault ceiling in Old World-style lettering. The compass evokes thoughts of English trade with the East and Far Eastern cultures that make their mark in many of the furnishings inside.

Sources: design, custom doormat, cast iron urns and chairs, antique planter stand, and copper, bronze and iron wall fountain, Tower Hill Antiques & Design in Red Bank; special assistance to the designer, Blaisdell Architectural Design Center; compass design, Raymond Valerio of Tower Hill Antiques & Design; painting, Elizabeth Gersten in Belmar and Tim Murphy of Tim Murphy Decorative Painting in Milford.


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Front Hall: In the foyer, also designed by Raymond Valerio, guests are greeted by a splash of color on an antique wingchair bench. A few steps forward reveal a collection of period pieces, including an early nineteenth century chest of drawers and cobalt Venetian mirror. Atop the chest rests a French crystal urn lamp. Opposite this setting, a finely decorated nineteenth-century English tall-case clock keeps time in graceful style. The decorative painting is by Tim Murphy and Elizabeth Gersten. The hand-painted ornamental design on the ceiling was painted on pieces of canvas. Each piece was cut and hung between the coffers. The walls were faux painted with a lime-based glaze, enhancing the original plaster.

Sources: design, Venetian mirror, lamp, tall-case clock, wingchair bench with Christopher Hyland fabric and Samuel & Sons trim, Tower Hill Antiques & Design in Red Bank; lampshades, The Lamplighter in Red Bank; decorative painting, Tim Murphy Decorative Painting in Milford; paint finishes, Elizabeth Gersten in Belmar; carpentry, Poplar Mountain Woodworks in Flemington.


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Master Bedroom: Jean Carrau Interieurs took advantage of the huge window in the grand hall and staircase, framing simply with checked material that sets the tone for this country estate. Adding elegance are the Oriental rug, Delft-like pottery, a large tapestry, and goldleaf trim on the mirror and chandelier.

Sources: design, furniture, accessories, decorative painting, Jean Carrau Interieurs in New Rochelle, New York; fabrics, Clarence House; upholstery, Lanera Decorating in Mamaroneck, New York; trims, M&J Trimming in New York City; lighting, Vaughan Lighting; rugs and tapestries, Mastour Galleries in New York City; carpets, Starr Carpet in Englewood, New Jersey; hardware, P.E. Guerin in New York City; curtain rods, Morgik Metal Designs in New York City; gilding, Ateliers Gohard Paris in Paterson; faux trees, Permanent Foliage Solutions in Long Island City, New York.


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Library & Loggia: The library and adjacent loggia set an Old World ambience thanks to designs by Pat Mills, Lynda Berger, and Connie Majeski of Byford & Mills. A woodland carving over a stately fireplace large enough to roast the bounty of the day’s hunt, handsome leather-bound books housed in illuminated niches, and the masculine and feminine play of chintz, plaid, paisleys, hounds tooth and other paired textures, and patterns create an elegant yet casually warm space reminiscent of an English country manor library. V&J Construction Co. restored the cracked wall plaster then applied a lightly textured, hand-troweled, three-color lime plaster in a bluish-gray shade, leaving the wall surfaces smooth with a matte finish. In the powder room, the clever play of tartan-upholstered walls, stag print ceiling, kilt-sporting sink, and richly textured draperies reflect a playful interpretation on tradition. The library spills out onto a boxwood and ivy-trimmed loggia, making it the perfect spot to relax and gaze upon the surrounding grounds.

Sources: design, antiques, accessories, custom draperies, flooring, Byford & Mills in Little Silver; fabrics, Clarence House, Cowtan & Tout, Old World Weavers, Ralph Lauren, all in New York City; Newfoundland portraits by the library door, Mary Connell Gaynor in Rumson; other art, Byford & Mills; woodcarving mural above mantel, Martin & Fowler Studios in Wayne; loggia plantings, Molzon Landscape Nursery in Lincroft; portieres, Opdyke Furniture in Point Pleasant Beach; upholstery, Peary Upholstery in Atlantic Highlands and Ed’s Upholstery in Brick; walls, V&J Construction Co. Plaster Artisans in Kenilworth; paint, Farrow & Ball in New York City; wallpaper and paint artist, Gerard Lingwood in Red Bank.


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Petite Retreat: The cozy sanctuary just off the entry draws in guests to quietly reflect on the beauty of the natural world around them, says Sheila Rich of Sheila Rich Interiors. The room’s architectural symmetry is enhanced by matching chairs and wall hangings. The chairs’ floral silk fabric embraces the home’s nature themes, while coordinated plaids in warm golds, apricots, burgundies, and greens create a bridge to the present. The diminutive size of the room is echoed in the furniture and, coupled with the rich copper color of the domed ceiling, gives the room and its guests a feeling of warmth, comfort, and harmony. American Clay Enterprises donated its natural earth plaster, which khl studio applied to the walls and ceiling. The material is eco-friendly, offers sound and heat insulation, and can be custom tinted.

Sources: design, Sheila Rich Interiors in Monmouth Beach; Italian bench and chairs, A.A. Empire Antiques in Hightstown with upholstery by Don’s Upholstery Shop in Hamilton; window treatment fabrication, Alexandra Draperies & Accessories in Colts Neck; drapery and upholstery fabric, Kravet in Bethpage, New York; drapery trim, Major Mills in Clark; floral arrangements, Creative Displays in Tinton Falls; painting and repairs, Holcombe Construction in Leonardo; rug, Nima Oriental Rugs in Red Bank; light fixture, Capitol Lighting in Eatontown; glazed and distressed woodwork details and troweled American Clay wall and ceiling finish, Kristin Holmes Linder of khl studio in Briarcliff Manor, New York.


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Peacock Alley: Merilyn Marshall-Cullen of MMC Designs created a wallpaper that echoes the peacock, birds, and fauna motif found in the original ironwork at the 1915 home. Called Peacock Alley, this space is a passageway between two small anterooms. “The simple beauty of light and dark strike the spirit with a moment of sheer beauty,” she says. “Peacock Alley is my homage to the elegance of light and dark … to be enjoyed as a serene passage or its own destination.”

Sources: overall and wallpaper design, MMC Designs in Summit; consultant, Peter Froden through MMC Designs; lighting design, Dorian Webb for Viaggio in New York City; floral design, Jude Del Duca of Stahl-Del Duca in Summit; antique prints, Danielle Ann Millican Inc. in Florham Park; antiques, Bonny Nieman Antiques in Summit; workroom, Workroom Services Inc. in Warren.


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Aviary: Bronze metalwork on the door in this small arched room at the end of a hallway inspired designer Cathy Oswandel. “This extraordinary hallway contains one of the most important pieces of ornamental metalwork in the house, created by famed artist Oscar Bach,” Oswandel says. She interpreted it by designing walls that showcase a graceful peacock, smaller birds, and creeping foliage. The ceiling and walls were adorned using the ancient hand-painted secco-fresco technique depicting birds and botanicals. The delicate azurite blue surfaces were hand-troweled and hand-polished with multiple coats of marble plaster. Decorative artist Judith Luke applied the finishes. “This lovely aviary will provide a joyful and unique space, well-deserved for the residents of this grand house, for many years to come,” Oswandel says.

Sources: design, Cathy Oswandel Interior Designer in Little Silver; decorative artist, Judith Luke in Chatham; plant stands, Niermann Weeks in New York City; chandelier, Foundry Lighting in New York City; iron and glass table, Summer Hill Ltd. in New York City; plants, Sickles Market in Little Silver; silk floral arrangement, Rumson China and Glass in Rumson; accessories, Cathy Oswandel Interior Designer and Hinson & Co. in New York City.


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Solarium: Designer Frank DelleDonne was inspired by the view of the gardens, the scale of the room, and the natural light in the solarium. He wanted to bring the outside in, which he did with a furniture layout that allows everyone to enjoy the views. He also mixed textures and scale for a natural feeling. The ceiling is covered in strié wallpaper cut and installed in a basket-weave design. The walls are hand-blocked wallpaper featuring roses scaled to suit the room. The gardens influenced the lighting fixtures, including the twig chandelier hand-painted to resemble birch trees and polished nickel sconces that look like branches. The fireplace screen (not shown) was custom-designed and made to mirror the interior curve of the fireplace. The large piece of art hanging above the carved altar table is a charcoal drawing of roses and is part of DelleDonne’s personal collection. He designed the large-scale base molding with a carved Greek key motif and chose sisal layered with antique runners for the floor. DelleDonne says the furniture and accessories span decades, continents, materials, tones, and textures, resulting in a comfortable, elegant room that will stand the test of time.

Sources: design, Frank DelleDonne Interiors in Summit; sofa fabric, Romo Textiles in New York City; throw pillow fabric, Claremont in New York City; paint and ceiling paper, Farrow & Ball; painting, Dilly Painting Corp. in Mendham; woodworking, Glenn Van Sickle in Toms River; wallpaper installation, Joseph Zemaneck in Lake Hopatcong; handcrafted and upholstered furniture, Paul J. Mazzola Inc. in Hillburn, New York; reproduction Jean-Michel Frank chair (to left of sofa), Pollaro Custom Furniture in Union; fireplace screen, La Forge Française in Riverhead, New York; sisal flooring, Tai Ping Carpets in New York City.


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Living Room: Patricia Healing and Daniel Barsanti of Healing Barsanti designed a living room for a sophisticated family that loves being on the cutting edge of life. Colors reign supreme, clear, and to the point. The attention-getting sofa fabric is the signature “New Vase” by Clarence House. All furnishings are designed for easy living and comfort, Healing says: “This is a relaxed space in which to truly live.”

Sources: design, Healing Barsanti/HB Home Design in Greenwich and Westport, Connecticut; walls, Farrow & Ball “Churlish Green” #251; sofas, Billy Baldwin Collection by Ventry Ltd. with Clarence House “New Vase” fabric; custom plexiglass cocktail tables, all other custom furniture, pony skin rugs, pillows, other accessories, HB Home Design; bergeres, antique.


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Flower Cutting Room: The sophisticated design of the flower cutting room and flower anticipation room (seen through the arched doorway) takes cues from the home’s architecture. Jim Dove of Canterbury Design chose dark cherry dyed cabinetry with crackle mirrors and embellished with beveled glass flowers to create an airy, reflective space ideal for cutting and arranging flowers, provided here by Jerry Rose Floral & Event Design.

Sources: design and Canterbury Bespoke cabinetry, Canterbury Design Kitchen Interiors in Morristown; floral, greenery, and home and garden décor, Jerry Rose Floral & Event Design in Maplewood; onyx trim, Virtue Tile in Summit; countertops, True Form Concrete in Flanders; chandelier, Vaughan Lighting in New York City; decorative painting, Kenneth Caruso of Alternative Interiors in Basking Ridge.


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Dining Room: Luis Acevedo Interior Design created a dining room for a young, sophisticated family. A backdrop of ivory, celery, and pale coral is the perfect foil for an eclectic collection of furniture in a mix of rich dark wood stains and hand-painted finishes. Two tables, of very different styles, can accommodate a large formal dinner party or a casual lunch for four near the windows. With exposures to the east, south, and west, the room affords spectacular views of the formal gardens and reflecting pool all year round.

Sources: design, Luis Acevedo Interior Design in Leonia; furniture and accessories, Agostino Antiques in Red Bank and New York City, The Ivory Bird in Montclair, and Baker Furniture, Ebanista, Hinson & Co., Mclain Wiesand through Summer Hill Ltd., Michael Taylor Designs, and Niermann Weeks, all in New York City; porcelain, Mottahedeh in New York City, crystal and linens, The Elegant Egg Cup in New York City, Roslyn Berlin in Fort Lee, and The Antique Cupboard in Waukesha, Wisconsin; flowers and plants, In the Garden in Highlands; fabrics and trim, Brunschwig and Fils and Samuel & Sons in New York City; draperies, The Ruffled Window in Bergenfield; oil painting by Richard Honymar, James Yarosh Associates in Holmdel; carpet, Orley and Shabahang in New York City; custom wall coverings, Martin & Fowler Studios in Wayne; custom finishes, Barok Prime Finishes in Elmwood Park; paint, Benjamin Moore; painting, Marc Tauro Painting in Highlands; special consultant, Michael Schorndorf through Luis Acevedo.


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Serving Room: Designers Diane Romanowski and Kathleen Wallace created the elegant serving room (bottom right). Decorative artist Carrol DiLustro of The Painted Finish implemented artistic finishes, including the goldleaf ceiling, stained wood floor, and distressed-wax cabinets. Their collective goal was to enhance the existing architecture and design an elegant transition from the kitchen to the dining room. They created a memorable space with a diverse palette of sensuous fabrics, fine details, and rich finishes. The design scheme reflects their philosophy of timeless quality that captures beauty and functionality.

Sources: design, Diane Romanowski Interior Design in Rumson and Kathleen Wallace Interiors in Allenhurst; decorative finishes; Carroll DiLustro of The Painted Finish in Tinton Falls; antique brass armless chair, Agostino Antiques; sterling silver Gorham tea service, Antique Cupboard in Waukesha, Wisconsin; landscape paintings, Beauregard Fine Art in Rumson; cabinetry hardware, Bullet Lock Co. in Long Branch; round bulls-eye mirrors (not shown in photo), Byford & Mills; rock crystal chandelier, Chameleon Fine Lighting in New York City; window seat and drapery, made by Susan Portera in Fair Haven with fabric by Lee Jofa in New York City; trim for all fabrics and chair seat, Samuel & Sons in New York City; dinner plates (Chelsea Bird pattern), Dancing Monkeys (white figurines on left countertop), plum chargers, Mottahedeh & Co in New York City.; antique-finish inset bevel mirrors, Precision Mirror & Glass in Eatontown; sterling silver dessert forks and tea spoons and tea service, Roslyn Berlin Fine Silver in Fort Lee; two-tier silver dessert serving tray, crystal, glass stemware, The Elegant Egg Cup in New York City.


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Hearth of the Home: In preserving the integrity of the original “thatched-palace” design of the home, Edith Leonardis of Leonardis Kitchen Interiors combined Venetian plaster walls with stone and wood countertops, limestone floors, and a custom stone hearth to coordinate with the estate’s country ambience. The kitchen features Downsview cabinetry with hand finishes that include a rub-through aging process and distressing. With simplicity of form and materials, Leonardis fashioned a warm, cozy, and welcoming setting punctuated with a touch of romance.

Sources: design, Leonardis Kitchen Interiors in Morristown featuring Downsview cabinetry; range, Le Cornue Fe by La Cornue, Williams-Sonoma in Shrewsbury; Sub-Zero and Wolf appliances, The Westye Group in Roslyn Heights, New York; stone hearth and fireplace, François & Co. in New York City; flooring and backsplash, Artistic Tile in Paramus; plants and flowers, Philip Sammut of Pedestals Floral Decorators in New York City; stone for countertop, Dente Trading Co. in Cedar Grove, fabricated by Bedrock Granite Inc. in Edison; wood countertop, Brooks Custom in Mount Kisco, New York; accessories, Greenbaum Interiors in Patterson and Morristown.


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Breakfast/Family Room: Steven Fioravanti of Greenbaum Interiors designed this space so the family has a place to gather for a sun-filled breakfast beneath warm wood beams. Inspired by nature’s palette, this area and the adjacent sitting area (not shown) feature a limestone hearth that beckons one to “come sit and relax.” The glow of the lanterns and sconces accentuates the hand-painted ceiling.

Sources: design, furniture and accessories, Steven Fioravanti of Greenbaum Interiors in Patterson and Morristown; fabrics and trim, Cowtan & Tout, Edelman Leather, Carlton V, and Houles, all in New York City; wall covering, Phillip Jeffries in Fairfield; lighting, Vaughan Lighting in New York City; faux painting, Judy Mulligan in Gladstone; place settings, Yamazaki Tableware in Hackensack and Mottahedeh & Co. in New York City.


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Reflections and Lightness Cultivated: Felicia Zwebner of Art de Triomphe paid tribute to the time when the home was built as a summer retreat for New York City socialites to entertain and relax. Cascading fabrics lend an air of mystery about what lies ahead and introduce a Roaring Twenties atmosphere. The walls and ceiling are finished in a pale blue pearlized glaze with goldleaf applications. Zwebner also designed a parlor room that offered a glimpse at what life was like for New York’s upper class before their world vanished.

Sources: room and chair design, peacocks and pedestals, Felicia Zwebner of Art de Triomphe in Teaneck; chandelier, Lampworks in New York City; chair and drapery fabric, Stroheim & Romann in New York City; carved mahogany pedestal table, Ebanista in New York City; wall and ceiling treatment, Scenic Surfacing in Jersey City, floral arrangement, Katydid in Red Bank.


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Mudroom Gallery: Artist Mary Connell Gaynor created the mudroom gallery and back staircase gallery. She also had her oil paintings of the homeowner’s two Newfoundlands on display in the library.

Source: paintings and gallery design, Mary Connell Gaynor in Rumson.


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Master Bedroom: Jean Carrau Interieurs created a master bedroom that is inviting and warm, charming yet chic, where the owners of the house can rest and relax. The use of old lime in the painting process gives the room a unique atmosphere of having always been there. Carrau trained as a designer and decorative painter in Brussels and attended École du Louvre in Paris.

Sources: design, furniture, accessories, decorative painting, Jean Carrau Interieurs in New Rochelle, New York; fabrics, Clarence House; upholstery, Lanera Decorating in Mamaroneck, New York; trims, M&J Trimming in New York City; lighting, Vaughan Lighting; rugs, Mastour Galleries in New York City; carpets, Starr Carpet in Englewood, New Jersey; hardware, P.E. Guerin in New York City; curtain rods, Morgik Metal Designs in New York City; gilding, Ateliers Gohard Paris in Paterson; ceiling medallion and door plaques, Hyde Park Moulding in Hauppauge, New York; bed linens, Lynnens in Greenwich, Connecticut; faux trees, Permanent Foliage Solutions in Long Island City, New York; lamp shades, Arrow Lighting in Larchmont, New York.


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Master Bedroom Corridor: Kathleen K. Donnelly of Beauregard Fine Art created a fine art gallery in this corridor leading to the master bedroom. “Interior design creates space, art enhances it,” she says. Decorative painting on the walls and ceiling is by Kristin Holmes Linder of khl studio, and the interior design is by Kimberly Formato of Cuyler Mathews Interiors.

Sources: selection and placement of artwork, Kathleen K. Donnelly of Beauregard Fine Art in Rumson; decorative painting, Kristin Linder of khl studio in Briarcliff Manor, New York; interior design, Kimberly Formato of Cuyler Mathews Interiors in Princeton and New York City; lighting, Carlos de la Puente in New York City; antiques, Atlantic Gallery and Bermingham & Co., both in New York City; drapery, Peary Upholstery in Atlantic Highlands; carpets, Nazmiyal in Red Bank and New York City.


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Master Bathroom: Comfort and scale combine with luxurious materials in the master bathroom, designed by architect Cate Comerford, AIA, CID. Her concept was to create intimately scaled bathing spaces. “I divided the large, cold, open space into his and her vanity areas that join together in the shower,” she says. “The original architectural geometries were incorporated into the new design: a barrel vault in the shower, a golden section in her bathing space, and a square in the make-up area.” A.W. Eurostile in Shrewsbury assisted in the design of the stone and tilework and supplied those materials, including the vanity top and limestone mirror surround behind the tub. One of the highlights of the room is an intricate wave design created with marble mosaic in the limestone floor. Lou Vitale installed the tile and stone.

Sources: architecture and interior design, Cate Comerford, AIA, CID, in Ocean Grove; bath vanities and cabinet work, Aanensen’s in Kearny and Ocean Grove; stone and tilework, A.W. Eurostile in Shrewsbury with installation by Lou Vitale; window treatments, Interior Elegance by Elki in Wayne; Venetian plaster walls and styling, Mary Catherine McCarthy of MCM2 in Wall; shower glass and mirrors, Monmouth Glass Co. in Asbury Park; chandeliers, Remains Lighting in New York City; bath fixtures, Waterworks Inc. in New York City.


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Master Bedroom Closet: Jan Murphy of Antiquity turned the master bedroom closet into a quietly elegant space in the corner of the house. With its calming tones and luxurious furnishings, it’s the perfect place for self-indulgence.

Sources: design, Jan Murphy of Antiquity in Red Bank; general contractors, A.V. Murphy Builders in Red Bank; paintings, Beacon Fine Arts Gallery in Red Bank; door hardware, Bullet Lock Co. in Long Branch; window treatment, fabrication by Curtain Call in Colts Neck, hardware by Morgik Metal in New York City, and tiebacks by Osborne & Little in Stamford, Connecticut; horsehair stools with nail heads, Lewis Mittman and Holly Hunt, both in New York City; console table under window, Niermann Weeks in New York City; all rugs, Orley & Shabahang in New York City; antique glass mirrors on doors, Precision Mirror & Glass in Eatontown; decorative painting on mirrored closet door, The Painted Finish in Tinton Falls; wall covering, Bart Halpern Inc. in New York City; wall covering trim, Samuel & Sons in New York City; painting and wallpaper applications, Michael Lamb Painting and Wallpapering in West Long Branch; various table accessories, Tower Hill Antiques in Red Bank.


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Bathroom: A small, but unique bathroom was somewhat hidden off a main second-floor hallway. It originally housed a large closet filled with narrow drawers, a tub, a sink on legs, and a commode. Geri Ruka Associates devised a plan that called for gutting the closet area and adding custom cabinetry of open shelving for towels, linens, and the like and with drawers below for incidentals. The center of the two cabinets is a dressing table and stool. This arrangement gives the space a more functional use. Custom cabinetry was made by John Ferrin of Timeless Designs Inc. With the coordination of glass tiles, wood cabinetry, and wallpaper colors to bring out the beautiful mix of color in the flooring, the space takes on an all-over complete look.

Sources: design, Geri Ruka Associates in Spring Lake; tile, Artistic Tile in Shrewsbury; tile installation, Acerra Tile LLC in Oceanport; counter fabricator, ACD Custom Granite in Ocean Township; fabrics, Clarence House in New York City; custom dressing table, G&J Custom Millwork & Cabinets in Wall Township; custom cabinetry, John Ferrin of Timeless Designs Inc. in Oceanport; cabinet installation, Kelly’s Custom Woodworking in Beachwood; window treatments, Bud McKnight Drapery Service in Lincroft; slipcover, Elite Upholstery in Lake Como; carpentry, Rumson Management in Rumson; painting, Rumson Painting Co. in Wall.


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Nursery: This modern take on the traditional nursery features soothing colors but in bold patterns and interesting textures. Parrish Chilcoat and Joe Lucas of Lucas Studio designed the space. The woven wool rug provides a road map for the color scheme. Walls in a pale lemony hue provide a subtle backdrop for graphic window treatments: curtains in a Suzani motif and Roman shades in a Moroccan-themed stripe. The bed canopy and daybed fabric playfully interpret the traditional Tree of Life motif. An upholstered glider chair wears a vibrant striped fabric, adding a sense of order to the exuberant surroundings. The ceiling is seafoam grass cloth. Furniture ensures comfort, convenience, and sustainability. The crib (which converts to a toddler bed) and changing trunk (not shown) are bamboo. Framed alphabet flash cards are beautiful and functional.

Sources: design, Lucas Studio Inc. in West Hollywood, California; upholstery and Roman shades, Jonas Fine Upholsterers and Curtain Makers in New York City; daybed curtain fabrics, Ferrick Mason in Los Angeles; daybed wall fabric, Katie Leede & Co. in Santa Monica, California; curtain, Roman shade and glider fabrics, Martyn Lawrence-Bullard Design in Los Angeles; daybed trims, Lee Jofa in New York City; crib and changing trunk, Kalon Studios in Los Angeles; closet styling and clothing, Linda Layman of All Dolled Up in Bay Head; toys and accessories, Jackrabbit Toys in Shrewsbury and Sea Girt; clothing and accessories, Babesta in New York City; dollhouse, Ann Morris Antiques in New York City; lamps, tables, art, and accessories, Mecox Gardens in New York City; daybed art, accessories, Harbinger in West Hollywood, California; ceiling wallpaper, Phillip-Jeffries Ltd. in Fairfield; carpet, Stark Carpet in New York City; fireplace surround tile, Monmouth St. Tile in Red Bank and Sea Girt; painting and wallpaper installation, Steve Walker Fine Painting & Paperhanging in Atlantic Highlands.


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Aviary Trio: Three connecting areas — vestibule, children’s bathroom, and sleeping porch — comprise an active hub between the children’s bedrooms, says Laurie Deliman-Burke, ASID, CID, and principal of L.D. Burke Designs. A Swedish clock stands at the vestibule entrance (not shown), where you can look through the bathroom to the sleeping porch. A wall of French doors in the bathroom allows for plenty of natural light, shining brightly on a hand-painted mural depicting leafy branches and birds in flight. The open sleeping porch offers breezy views of the backyard and beckons one to take a nap or curl up with a book.

Sources: design, daybed, outdoor table, étagère, stool, L.D. Burke Designs in Monmouth Beach; bath accessories, bird plates and planters, mirror, sconce, Creative Space in Red Bank; all other accessories, L.D. Burke Designs; decorative painting, Jill Broderick of Interior Affairs in Hazlet; Lisa Marie O’Connell painting, Beacon Fine Arts Gallery in Red Bank; carpentry, Frank Bordinalli of Riccio’s Cabinet Shop in Long Branch; drapery workroom, Bud McKnight Drapery Service in Lincroft; drapery hardware, CMI Inc. in Springfield; fabrics, Carlton V and F. Schumacher & Co. in New York City, Aláxi/Silver State Fabrics in Salt Lake City, and Duralee in Bayshore, New York; decorative trim, Duralee and Bargia; indoor rug, Orley & Shabahang; wall-to-wall carpeting in bathroom and outdoor rug, Carpets by Robert in Long Branch; vestibule clock, British Cottage in Red Bank; bathroom chandelier, Currey & Co. in Atlanta; vestibule chandelier and bathroom sconce, Capitol Lighting in Eatontown; painting and wallpaper hanging, Rob’s Decorating Co. in Fair Haven; wallpaper, Tyler Hall through Carlton V; upholstery, Belmar Upholstery in Belmar.


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Owen’s Room: Carol Morris and her staff at Swift-Morris Interiors created a teenaged boy’s room, aiming for a space that would accommodate the transition from childhood to young adulthood and highlight the various interests marking that change. “The room is centered on a neutral palette, and we kept the space interesting through layered textures and an array of funky found objects,” says the firm’s Danielle Ross. The seemingly simple scheme allows the room to act as a backdrop against which this young man has claimed the space by displaying memorabilia reflecting his interests. Geometric fabrics, solid suedes, and a clean but strong pinstriped wallpaper anchor the room. They’re enlivened by unique furniture that includes a free-form wood desk and colorful artwork.

Sources: design, Swift-Morris Interiors in Hoboken; desk chair, Donghia in Mount Vernon, New York; desk, Aardvark Antiques in Newport, Rhode Island; fabrics and wallpaper, Cowtan & Tout; Duralee in Bay Shore, New York; Kravet and Lee Jofa; artwork, Adrienne Crombie of Murals & Moldings in Frenchtown.


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Gift Wrapping Room: Denise Pauline and Paula Giba of Pauline’s Paperie furnished the gift-wrapping room with unique gift wraps, bags, boxes, ribbons, and cards.

Sources: design, Pauline’s Paperie in Red Bank; lighting, Byford & Mills in Little Silver; products, Snow & Graham, Waste Not Paper, Raffit Ribbons, all through Pauline’s Paperie.


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Maid’s Closet: Designing Elements transformed a closet into “Maid for Daydreaming,” a whimsical yet sophisticated retreat for daydreaming of being the lady of the house. Here she makes plans to travel the world, buy unique treasures, and entertain the elite. Robin’s egg blue, chocolate brown, and pops of lime green enhance the walls of the tiny space, making it a bold, yet cozy room with touches of vintage chic.

Sources: design, Designing Elements in Locust an Little Silver; blue and white china, British Cottage Antiques in Red Bank; floral prints (not shown), Le Papillon in Rumson; green throw, Opdyke Furniture in Point Pleasant Beach; tiered bird nest, Shutters in Fair Haven; molding and trims, Designer Source Inc. in Holmdel; carpentry, Marko Jaamann in Highlands; design consultation, Terje Jaamann in Highlands.


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Stair Hall: A bay window brightens the second-floor stair hall designed by Daniel Mullay Interior Design and Decoration. A silk balloon softens the light and fills the window, imported silk and wool damask panels are drawn to the sides, and a classic Regency valance adds a final statement. The window seat is covered in a classic animal print and embellished with feather pillows in a fabric that coordinates with the surrounding wallpaper. Opposite the window a settee provides an elegant spot to enjoy the view.

Sources: design, Daniel Mullay Interior Design and Decoration in Chatham; settee and pedestal, Agostino Antiques; drapery damask, Brunschwig & Fils; silk stripe fabric on balloon shade and settee, Kravet; wallpaper and window seat fabric, Cowtan & Tout; chandelier, Design Domaine in Bernardsville; carpet, Carpets by Robert in Long Branch; artwork, David Luke Fine Arts in Chatham; fabrication of drapery, pillow and window seat cushion, Natalina Drapery in Newark; and needlepoint pillows on settee and mirror (not shown), Pereaux Interior Design in Morristown.


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Linen Closet: Donna Domenicali of Blue Heron Designs created a linen closet titled Ciel et Sable (Sky and Sand). “At the end of a long day, you want to step out of the bath and wrap yourself in a thick, thirsty robe, then slip into fresh sheets that soothe your parched body,” she says. “You enter the cool lavender-scented comfort of the closet and select your favorite linens.” The crystal-laced shelves are filled with crisp sheets, soft towels, thick blankets, and lacey pillowcases. With the color of sky on the ceiling and water hues on the shelves, it’s a perfect home for your cherished linens. The texture of the golden grass cloth contrasts with the smooth sheets, while a crystal chandelier adds just a touch of sumptuousness. “It is an oasis that gives your thirsty senses a long drink of water and your starved soul a banquet of luxury,” she says.

Sources: design Donna Domenicali of Blue Heron Designs in Long Branch, crystal knobs, Cal Crystal/House of Knobs in Hicksville, New York; clock and various linens, Down to Basics in Red Bank; other linens and pillows, Duxiana in Red Bank; white drape and ties at top, trunk lining, and gimp, Eldridge Textiles in Eatontown; paint glazing, Faux Effects Inc. in Vero Beach, Florida; flowers, Nancy Conner Design in Mountainside; chandelier, Schonbek through Lamps Plus Professionals in Chatsworth, golden grass-cloth wallpaper and Candice Olsen crystal wallpaper covering the trunk, York Wall Coverings in York, Pennsylvania; paint, Benjamin Moore, trunk, www.craigslist.com, library stepstool, www.ebay.com.


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Hallway Galleries: Don and Carol Lynn Chetkin of Chetkin Gallery turned two hallways into galleries with original oil paintings.

Sources: artwork, Chetkin Gallery in Red Bank; painting, Domenic Ranieri of Domenic CPR Painting in Little Silver; trompe l’oeil, Jill Broderick of Interior Affairs in Hazlet; chandeliers and furnishings, John Gormley Antiques in Long Branch; carpets, Ebner Carpet Center in Red Bank.


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Guest Room: The guest room suite by Kensington Design features a beachy palette and velvety plaster painted finishes by Studio Fini, says Kim O’Connor, owner of Kensington Design. Wooly sweater material, inspired by the sheep at Sheep’s Run, covers the headboard. Glamorous window treatments and classic paisley designs in the fabrics and the silky carpet add classic touches, as do French antiques. The color scheme, luxurious fabrics and furnishings, and the artwork combine to make the space a restful yet fashionable space. (See the guest bathroom below.)

Sources: design, white club chairs, leather ottoman, Kensington Design in Wyckoff; decorative finishes, Studio Fini in Wyckoff and New York City; wool and silk carpet, Orley & Shabahang in New York City; fabrics, Kravet and Lee Jofa in Bethpage, New York; window treatments, Nancy’s Draperies in Fairfield; tufted bench, desk lamp, Nancy Corzine in New York City; custom headboard, duvet cover, pillows, Master’s Interiors in Clifton; bedding, Duxiana in Red Bank; onyx table lamps, Baker Knapp & Tubbs in New York City; French antiques, Côté France in New York City; sconces, Remains Lighting in New York City; side tables, Pierre Deux in Red Bank; artwork, ACA Galleries and George Glazer Galleries in New York City and Mark Gallery in Englewood; accessories, Niermann Weeks in New York City.


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Guest Bathroom: The timeless bathroom, designed by Kensington Design and provided by Waterworks, though fresh and modern in its simplicity, stays true to the style of the house. The floor is polished Calcutta marble in a basket-weave pattern. Decorative finishes in the softest blues combine with the natural variations of the stone, providing a peaceful, serene space. The pattern of the custom London window shade repeats the shape of the pool outside.


Sources: design, stone, tile, fixtures, hardware, accessories, Cindy Kovach of Waterworks in Ridgewood (this location now closed though the New York City locations remain open) in collaboration with Kim O’Connor of Kensington Design in Wyckoff; window treatment; decorative finishes, Studio Fini in Wyckoff and New York City; Nancy’s Draperies in Fairfield.


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Guest Office: Tricia Fitzsimmons of Bienvenue Home/Ambiance partnered with Leida Rodenburg of Leida’s Sewing to create a warm and inviting space in the guest office through the use of rich fabrics, warm colors, and an eclectic mix of furniture and artwork, including an Asian-inspired deep red chest standing opposite a desk and Parsons chair covered in an eye-catching striped fabric.

Sources: design and furniture, Tricia Fitzsimmons of Bienvenue Home/Ambiance in Fair Haven and Leida Rodenburg of Leida’s Sewing in Red Bank; draperies and slip cover, Leida’s Sewing; drapery fabric, Quadrille in New York City; drapery hardware, Robert Allen/Beacon Hill Showroom in New York City; ceiling and wall paint, Benjamin Moore; artwork, Susan Berke Fine Art in Red Bank; fabric Roman shades, The House Dressing in Little Silver with trim by Kravet; Parsons chair fabric, Lee Jofa; rug, Odegard in New York City.


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Home Office: Windows that look out onto the back yard allow natural light into a home office positioned at the top of the back stairs in a new addition to the home. Byford & Mills designed the space for the homeowners. The bee-pattern wallpaper on the ceiling is a nod to the bee keeping that takes place at Sheep’s Run.

Sources: design, Byford & Mills in Little Silver; desk, Century Furniture in Hickory, North Carolina; light fixture, Capitol Lighting; ceiling wallpaper, Thibaut in Newark; grass-cloth walls, Ralph Lauren in New York City; window treatment fabric, Brunschwig & Fils in New York City; window treatment trim, Houles in New York City; carpet, Carpets by Robert in Long Branch.


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Laundry: From the hexagon Calcutta gold marble and oak floor to the maple cabinetry painted in soft yellow, the laundry is a warm, bright spot designed by David Chiarella, a certified kitchen designer and principal of Creative Kitchens. Other features include a durable Pietra Cardoza granite countertop, a retractable built-in ironing board, and double soaking sinks that are perfect for tending to delicates, maintaining house plants, or cleaning up after arts and crafts. A sewing area (not shown) includes a drop-down sewing machine and a large collection of thread spools to make tailoring easy and colorful.

Sources: design and cabinetry, Creative Kitchens in Red Bank; wood countertop, Craft-Art Co. in Atlanta; stone countertops, Bedrock Granite in Edison; faucets, Nottingham Brass/Signature Hardware in Erlanger, Kentucky; washer and dryer, Eatontown TV & Appliance Co. in Eatontown; tile flooring, A Step in Stone in Red Bank; painter, Michael Short in Red Bank; window treatments, Lapidus Décor in Long Branch; curtain fabrication, Interiors and Anne Marie Mastria in Monmouth Beach; paper hanger, Best Paperhanging in Freehold.


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Media Room: Parrish Chilcoat and Joe Lucas of Lucas Studio worked with the homeowners and builder to tailor this newly constructed space to the family’s needs. Custom cabinetry reflects a traditional library but has an updated color palette. Ochre-painted millwork, natural burlap-lined walls, and Cowtan & Tout fabrics bring a sense of the sunny outdoors inside while keeping the room fresh and serene. The tufted sofa wears a durable, stain-resistant yet sumptuous mushroom velvet trimmed with a natural linen tassel and silk welt. Deep, comfy armchairs swivel to take in all the action of a game or a good conversation. Overhead, antique copper lanterns add a stately English feel. The technology for the media by Stereo & Video Integrators is housed behind a hidden panel yet is easily accessible.

Sources: design, Lucas Studio Inc.; custom architectural millwork, LBM Design in Long Branch; fabrics and trims, Cowtan & Tout in New York City; all upholstery and Roman shades, Jonas Fine Upholsterers & Curtain Makers in New York City; game table, lanterns, art, and various accessories, Ann Morris Antiques in New York City; lamps, tables, art, and accessories, Mecox Gardens in New York City; wall covering, Phillip-Jeffries Ltd. in Fairfield; wall-to-wall carpet, Stark Carpet in New York City; leather on game chairs, Holly Hunt in New York City; pillow fabrics, Claremont Fabrics in West Hollywood, California, and Jasper Fabrics in Santa Monica, California; other various accessories, Harbinger in West Hollywood, California; library book collection, Nick Harvill Libraries in West Hollywood; audio and video system and installation, Stereo & Video Integrators in Fair Haven; painting and wallpaper installation, Steve Walker Fine Painting & Paperhanging in Atlantic Highlands; carpet installation, Atlantic Flooring in Tinton Falls.


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Hallway Galleries: Danielle Ann Millican of Danielle Ann Millican Inc. created three hallway galleries, including the one pictured here. The illustrations above the stairway are from an 1864 illuminated alphabet that shows the different styles in which a single letter may be presented. They are positioned to spell “Sheep’s Run,” with the apostrophe formed by a ram’s horn. These pieces are flanked by five images of sheep done in 1842.

Sources: original antique prints, museum-quality framing, Danielle Ann Millican Inc. in Florham Park; painting, Phase II Maintenance Coatings in Scotch Plains; paint, Riccardi Bros. in Morristown; lighting, Capitol Lighting in East Hanover; carpet, Cove Carpet One Floor & Home in Summit; furnishings, Nevada Exchange in Red Bank.


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Hallway Gallery: Gina Bellando, owner of Frames and Framers of Short Hills, celebrated the art of the still life in this third-floor hallway gallery at the show house. As an art form, still life dates back many centuries. Whether paintings, prints, or, most recently, photography, still life imagery has a universal appeal with an underlying theme that one should enjoy the moment, as too soon the moment is gone. In this gallery, Bellando used still lifes much as a stage, and the objects — natural, machine-made, or handmade — are metaphors for nature and human form. The featured photographer is artist Howard Nathenson; works by several others round out the collection. Whimsy also makes an appearance in the form of unusual wall clocks, interspersed to complete the theme of images frozen in time.

Sources: photography and framing, Frames and Framers of Short Hills; wall finishes, Phase II Maintenance Coatings in Scotch Plains; furnishings, Nevada Exchange in Shrewsbury; lighting, Capitol Lighting.


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Attic Storage Room: The Brookdale Community College design team transformed a drab attic space into a fun and funky room for studying, listening to music, visiting with friends, and partying. The team included project managers Jessica Jovic and Kerensa Price and student designers Jaclyn Spilberg, Michael Toro, Jessica Fisler, Namratha Wunnava, Louise Hosseini, Esther Issakov, Pamela Hughes, Ruth Hymanson, Andrew Johnson, and Deborah Siehl. Celeste Chirichello and Patty Blaser are advisers.

Sources: design, Brookdale Community College student interior design team; furniture, Design Furniture in Marlboro; drapery, Chatham Rose in Fair Haven; area rug, Carpets by Robert in Long Branch; artist, David French; lighting, Elegant Lighting in Shrewsbury; wallcoverings, Ronald Redding for York Wallcoverings in York, Pennsylvania; fabrics, Carnegie in New York City and Duralee in Bay Shore, New York; paint, House of Paints in Sea Girt; carpentry, Michael Toro with Cricketland Design in Wall.


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In Pink Paisley: Patti Smith of P. Smith and Co. created a bedroom designed for a teen who wants to be on the edge of cool. An upholstered bed in shades of pink, gray, and white is the focal point. Girls who love funky, fun décor will love spending time in this bedroom.

Sources: design, P. Smith and Co. in Ridgewood; headboard mirror and nightstand, Christopher Guy in Fort Meyers, Florida; bedding, Ann Gish in New York City; light fixtures, John Richard in Greenswood, Mississippi; carpet, Shaw Industries in Dalton, Georgia; table lamp, Robert Abbey in Hickory, North Carolina; faux croc chair and rose paintings, Shine Home in San Juan Capistrano, California; window treatment fabric, Stroheim & Romann in New York City.


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Cedar Closet: Brooks Brothers designed a third-floor cedar closet as a showcase for a selection of its classic business and casual clothing for men and women.

Source: design and clothing, Brooks Brothers in Shrewsbury.


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Maid’s Closet: Kathryn Taylor of KTDesign transformed one the smallest, darkest spaces in the home: a maid’s closet she christened “Moonlight Minute.” It features a painted moon rising over a grassy landscape that grows over tiled walls around a wash sink.

Sources: design, KTDesign in Rumson; tile, Artistic Tile in Shrewsbury; tile installer, Mike Kirylo of Custom Tile Installations in Long Branch; muralist, Broeck Steadman in Rumson; wood craftsman, Gabriel Sanchez in Tinton Falls; welder, Victor Servenko in Wall Township; lighting, East End Brass & Design in Darien, Connecticut.


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Chambre à Couché: Betsy Berner and Tara Sutphin of Berner Sutphin Designs created a well-appointed suite that features a comfortable sitting area with a fireplace, a niche with a writing desk, a large walk-in closet, and a spacious bathroom, all of which make this room an inviting retreat any time of day. The designers achieved the composed atmosphere with a palette of warm neutrals and a mix of textures. Two contemporary fabrics paired with a nineteenth-century toile blend the old with the new. A combination of antiques and unique furnishings comes together for a fresh yet timeless design.

Sources: design and antique demilunes and lamps with Fortuny lamp shades on each side of bed, Berner Sutphin Designs in Red Bank; decorative painting of fireplace and walls, Carrol DiLustro of The Painted Finish; room painting, Cindy Deevy of Yes We Do LLC in Jackson; antique trunks near sofa, Ark Antiques in Moonachie; bed headboard, pillows, European shams, portieres, custom ottoman, K. Franka Upholstery in Brick; bed linens, Duxiana; library cart by fireplace, Ebanista in New York City; rug, Orley & Shabahang in New York City; sofa, fire screen, fabrics, Pierre Frey in New York City; all trims, Samuel & Sons in New York City; pillows, Sew What in Middletown; mural above fireplace, David B. Wiggins in Gilmanton New Hampshire; other art and framing, Motyka Fine Art & Framing in Mississauga, Ontario.


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Lutyens Writing Room: Russell Minion and Juan Carlos Gutierrez of Minion- Gutierrez drew inspiration for this room from the turn-of-the-last-century English architect Sir Edwin Lutyens, who employed many styles of architecture and always added wit and quirkiness. The room with its barrel-vaulted ceiling, floating upholstered walls, and alcove with transom windows set the mood for a warm and cozy writing room. Furnishings are a mix of Gothic, Neo-Georgian, Spanish, and Twentieth Century design, some custom-made by Minion-Gutierrez. An adjoining white-tile bath (not pictured) was original to the home, however, Minion-Gutierrez installed pine pilasters for depth and detail.

Sources: design Minion-Gutierrez in New York City; Chinese painting, Amy Karyn in Princeton; fabrics, Christopher Hyland in New York City; furniture, Baker, Arte Italica, Donghia, and Minion-Gutierrez, all in New York City, and DK Living in Cold Spring, New York; rug, Shehadi in Chatham; lighting, West Essex Electric in West Caldwell; wallpaper, Ralph Lauren Home with installation by Jecc Painting in Union; faux wood trim, Fauxtastic Wall Finishes in Freehold; plaster and carpentry, NY Tirex in Bloomfield; bath accessories, Waterworks.


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Pool House: Barbara Ostrom Associates added character to a new pool house in the backyard of the estate. European decorative beams, textured plaster walls, stone floors, and Old World detailing make the structure architecturally compatible with the main home. Cool aquatic colors and unique furniture create an irresistible invitation to step through the door and stay for a while. Barbara Ostrom Associates and S. DeCenzo Designs collaborated on all of the cabinetry and trim, including an entertainment center, window seat, and overmantel in the living area as well as the bathroom, kitchen, banquette, and changing room. The cabinetry is all Habersham with a vintage finish, says Sana DeCenzo. Doors (not shown in photo) feature a painted peacock motif based on the ornamental ironwork in the main house.

Sources: interior design, Barbara Ostrom Associates of Mahwah, New York City, and East Hampton, New York; cabinetry and woodwork design and installation, S. DeCenzo Design in Little Silver with Habersham cabinetry; faux stone floor and faux verde stained stucco wall, Michael A. Pappa Masonry in Red Bank; area rug, Stark Carpet in New York City; all fabrics, Old World Weavers in New York City; upholstered furniture, Swaim in High Point, North Carolina; chandeliers and sconces, Tomlinson Ewrin-Lambeth in High Point, North Carolina; drapery, Baum Draperies of Nutley; tables and accessories, Byford & Mills in Little Silver; upholstery of banquettes, window seats, and all cushions, Peary Upholstery in Atlantic Highlands; tile backsplashes, etc., A Step in Stone in Red Bank; flowers and plants, Alan’s Rumson Florist in Rumson; bath accessories, Down to Basics in Red Bank; mermaid painting over fireplace, Meredith Ostrom in Los Angeles; other paintings, James Yarosh Galleries in Holmdel; antique andirons and antique pond boats, Barbara Goldfarb of Design Logic in Little Silver; beams, Jeffrey Tilly LLC in Fair Haven; beam staining, Dave Wellner Painting in Oceanport; accessories, Agostino and The Antique Center of Red Bank.


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Potting Shed: The first challenge that British Cottage owners Keith and Tricia Nelson faced when furnishing the potting shed was to make the newly constructed building look as if it had been there forever. A vintage bronze coach-house lantern sets the tone, gently illuminating a central worktable, while freestanding, rusticated furniture provides plenty of space for work, storage, and display. The second challenge was marrying the architectural style of the building with its utilitarian function. Thus, the floor was tinted and polished, but still the poured concrete can withstand muddy boots and frequent wetting. Sturdy farmhouse tables not only look good but also are perfect for potting plants and setting seeds. Painted cup racks, vintage botanicals, and a big clock enhance the soaring walls while the profusion of plants, pots, and flowers from Guaranteed Plants & Florist in Locust gives the room a feast of color.

Sources: design and furnishings, British Cottage in Red Bank; plants, Guaranteed Plants & Florist in Locust; concrete flooring, Michael A. Pappa Masonry in Red Bank.


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Dog Shower & Potting Shed Bathroom: Avra Karak, owner of Monmouth St. Tile, designed the dog shower and potting shed bathroom. For the dog shower, she elevated dog grooming to a whole new level with this special area in the garage. In the potting shed bathroom, she captured the whimsical essence of the honeycomb pattern and the beauty of aged stone. Using reclaimed antique terra cotta flooring created an Old World feel, as did incorporating an original porcelain sink found on the property.

Sources: design and tile featuring Trikeenan Tileworks & Country Floors, Avra Karak of Monmouth St. Tile in Red Bank and Sea Girt; Rohl faucet, Kitchen & Bathworks in Shrewsbury; chandelier, Lavish Lighting in Shrewsbury; tile installation, Frank Van Brunt Creative Installation in West Long Branch.


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Entrance Oval: The Architectural Record once described the home as a thatched palace, and that inspired Siciliano Landscape Co. in its design of the entrance oval — a formal hedge of boxwood circling a majestic urn filled with colorful flowers that change with the season. Master gardener Kim Nuccio began the transformation of the area by amending the soil and installing a sod border to soften the space and separate the planting bed from the entrance drive. Her selection of flowers for the boxwood interior and the urn was influenced by the romantic charm of this Cotswold-style country cottage.

Sources: design and installation, Siciliano Landscape Co. in Red Bank; urn, Due Process Stable Trading Co. in Colts Neck.


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Grand Front Entrance: Guaranteed Landscaping Inc., under the helm of owner and CEO Tim Malone, designed and installed the Grand Front Entrance, adding flowering plants and shrubs that enhance the red brick exterior and create lush color, texture, and interest at the front of the home.

Source: design and installation, Guaranteed Landscaping Inc. in Middletown.


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White Garden: Famed gardener Vita Sackville West’s work at Sissinghurst in Kent, England, inspired landscaper Leigh Sorensen to create a white garden at Sheep’s Run. Sissinghurst and Sheep’s Run have similar brick and roof pitches. Sorensen gave the garden form and interest with strong foliage colors: blue Picea pungens ‘Glauca’ (globosa spruce) at each end, lime green Alchemilla mollis (lady’s mantle) and sedum, red leaves on White Out roses; and white Cornus alba ‘Elegantissima Variegata’. Adding to the snowy appearance were several white flowers — including spiky foxglove, peonies, astilbe, and Profusion zinnias — and flowering shrubs — including Viburnum x carlcephalum ‘Cayuga’, enkianthus, hydrangea ‘Annabelle’, and hibiscus ‘Diana’. Sorensen made the sheep jumping over the wall in the distance from chicken wire sprayed white.

Source: design and installation, Leigh Sorensen Landscape Design in Rumson.


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Moonlight Garden: Susan Garon Smith designed Moonlight Garden for Greenleaf Landscape Systems & Services. The intimate walled garden room recalls the famed English garden style of Vita Sackville-West at Sissinghurst in England. “I wanted to create a calm, intimate space in which one can experience a restful interlude,” Garon Smith says. “The interplay of blues and whites with the moonlight creates an atmosphere that is serene yet rich in texture. The brick and gravel path leads to a seating area from which to enjoy the planted gothic urns, lush beds, or one’s secret thoughts.

Sources: design Susan Garon Smith; installation, Greenleaf Landscape Systems & Services Inc. in Red Bank.


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Breakfast Terrace: Odyssey Land Design Group chose materials for the breakfast terrace to match existing brick and bluestone. A wrought iron wall trellis adorns the north wall of the space, accented with a peacock to mimic the dozens of birds of iron on many of the window and railing features on the original home. Boxwood and roses frame the space and are accented by carefully selected perennials and groundcovers. Herbs selected by the homeowners were planted near the kitchen.

Sources: design and installation, Odyssey Land Design Group in Howell; ginkgo, Halka Nurseries in Millstone Township; boxwoods, Blue Ridge Boxwoods in Warrensville, North Carolina; perennials, Cicconi Farms in Jackson; irrigation, installed by Colts Neck Irrigation in Freehold; furniture, Classic Elements/Winston Furniture through Opdyke Furniture in Point Pleasant Beach.


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Rear Terrace: Shore Architectural Design in Rumson and Brielle installed the rear raised terrace (in addition to the front entrances). Opdyke Furniture furnished the terrace as well as the kitchen patio, and pool surround. On the terrace, aluminum furniture with a wrought iron look lends a classic ambience, enhanced by tailored cushions for comfort. Other features include a fire pit/coffee table and a hand-painted illuminated patio umbrella.

Sources: stone patio and plantings, Shore Architectural Design in Rumson and Brielle; furnishings, Lane Venture through Opdyke Furniture in Point Pleasant Beach; cast aluminum furniture, Castelle Cast Aluminum in Fort Lauderdale, Florida; hand-painted umbrella, Hedge Row Studio in Pasadena, California.


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A Formal Invitation: Susan Cohan Gardens created a serene yet highly detailed outdoor living space outside of the conservatory in keeping with the rest of the gardens on the estate. Within that context, she experimented with juxtaposing rustic elements typical of a farm setting — such as the furniture — with the overall formality of the property. The gardens create views from the inside the house and offer a place to stroll or relax.

Sources: design, Susan Cohan Gardens in Chatham; construction, A. Scheppe Landscaping in Summit; lighting design, NatureScape Lighting in Millington; Italian terra cotta containers, Seibert & Rice in Short Hills; stone bird sculpture, by Steven R. Snyder Sculpture in Pipersville, Pennsylvania.


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The Great Lawn: Formed with boxwood hedging around its perimeter, the great lawn by Twin Industries is in the form of a parterre. The space has two large koi ponds as water features at each end of its longitudinal axis, and its geometric shape is further reinforced by a bluestone lawn border and matching bluestone copings around each pond. Pachysandra adds a lush look around the perimeter of the lawn between the bluestone lawn border and the boxwood hedge. Prolific beds of pansies around the rear of the koi ponds and hydrangeas in the hedged areas at each end of the parterre provide color. Winter King Hawthornes in each corner of the parterre add multiseasonal interest, under planted with more pachysandra as a uniform and effective evergreen groundcover.

Source: landscaping, Louis Rissland and Keith A. Nesbitt of Twin Industries in Staten Island, New York.


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Pool Garden: Designed by Bahrs Nursery & Landscaping Inc., the pool garden is a modern interpretation of a Victorian perennial garden. For full-season interest, the firm started with early-spring-flowering bulbs, shrubs, and perennials; then progressed to summer-flowering crape myrtles and roses; and finished with late-summer perennials.

Sources: design and installation, Bahrs Nursery & Landscaping Inc. in Neptune; pool, Edgewater Pools in Red Bank; furniture, Laneventure through Opdyke in Point Pleasant Beach and Gensun Casual Living in Ontario, California.


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Swimming Pool: Edgewater Pools Inc. designed, engineered, and built the classically shaped pool, spa, fountain, and patio in the backyard entertainment area.

Sources: Edgewater Pools Inc. in Red Bank, furnishings, Opdyke Furniture in Point Pleasant Beach and Gensun Casual Living in Ontario, California; garden, Bahrs Nursery and Landscaping in Neptune.


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Kitchen Gardens: Norman Hungerford, PhD, and his team at Marlboro Flower & Garden Center wanted to create inviting and functional gardening areas for the young couple who live on the estate. Their inspiration came from sheep grazing nearby along with beehives, grapevine orchards, and the wife’s love of organic gardening. The firm built a raised garden bed to account for the high water table in the yard and filled it with lots of herbs. Citrus and bay trees grow in clay pots that can be moved into the potting shed for protection during the winter.

Source: design and installation, Marlboro Flower & Garden Center in Marlboro.


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Arched Entrance: Sandy Henning Landscape Design created the driveway entrance garden, taking advantage of the striking metal arch connecting brick walls on each side of a former driveway into the estate. Her garden design follows the curve of the brick walls and includes, among other plants, Southern magnolia, golden chain tree, Aurora dogwood, star magnolia, and crabapple trees for height; French lilac, serviceberry, holly, and hydrangeas for color and texture; and smaller shrubs and flowers for added color and interest.

Source: design, Sandy Henning Landscape Design in Rumson.


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Secret Garden: Total Concepts created a romantic pathway leading to a secret garden. Brick and stone pavers create a natural-looking path that winds around colorful flowers and a low hedge set under six mature deciduous trees.

Source: landscaping, Total Concepts in Colts Neck.